19 Essential Oils for Anxiety, Concentration, & More + Wellness Blend

essential oils natural wellness Mar 23, 2021
child studying homework without essential oils

Essential oils can go a long way in helping young and old alike. You can use essential oils for anxiety, concentration, your immune system, and more. Here are 19 essential oils to use this school year.


Table of Contents
How do you use essential oils?
Are essential oils safe for children?
Essential oils for anxiety
Essential oils for concentration
Essential oils for fatigue
Essential oils for colds and coughs
Immune boosting essential oils
Essential oil wellness blend
Other essential oil resources


Whether our kids are in school, we're in school ourselves, or we struggle with anxiety and staying focused at work - we’re all concerned with good health and finding helpful ways to get through the day.

One piece to the staying healthy puzzle that has been wonderful for my family is the use of essential oils - sometimes for a specific purpose, and other times a wellness blend that supports multiple concerns.

I'll share the recipe for that blend in a moment, but first, let’s answer a few basic questions about essential oils.

 

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How do you use essential oils?

You can use essential oils topically - sometimes as pure oil and other times diluted, depending on the oil. 

Many find relief in using essential oils on specific vita flex points on the hands and feet. 

You can also use them aromatically. For instance, using essential oils for anxiety is easy when you can take it with you: in a room diffuser, car diffuser, or jewelry diffusers (such as necklaces, bracelets, and earrings).

 

 

  

Are essential oils safe for children?

Just as there are medicines not recommended for toddlers or small children, there are essential oils also not recommended. 

Oils in this article will have safety and concern notes, or mention if they should not be used with children under 2. If any of the oils need to be diluted before contact with skin, it will be noted. 

When ratios are mentioned, the ratio is essential oil to carrier oil. For instance, the ratio 1:4 means 1 drop essential oil to 4 drops carrier oil.

When applying essential oils to children, always dilute 1-2 drops in 1/2 - 1 teaspoon carrier oil (almond oil, grapeseed oil, olive oil) or massage oil. If you want to use essential oils in the bath, always use a bath gel base as a dispersing agent for the oils. (Higley & Higley, 2013)

Let’s talk about some specific areas of concerns where essential oils may be beneficial.

 

 

  

Essential oils for anxiety

New school? Have a big test coming up? Got a deadline you need to meet?

Anxiety can hit hard and for a variety of reasons, whether from school, social situations, or work-related issues. Some of our favorite essential oils for anxiety are listed below. 



  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) - has been traditionally used for anxiety, calming, depression, insomnia, relaxation, stress, and tension.

    Studies have shown that inhalation aromatherapy with lavender had positive effects on reducing anxiety in patient before the surgery (source) as well as an effective intervention to decrease anxiety and depression in postpartum C-section mothers (source).

    Note: There are no known hazards or contraindications.

  • Lemon (Citrus limon) - is commonly used for anxiety, relaxation, and stress.

    Note: Lemon should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Lemon and 1 drop carrier oil. Lemon can cause photosensitivity. Avoid sunlight for 12 hours on the area of skin you applied it to. 

  • Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) - aids to calm oversensitive nerves and is helpful at combating stress and irritability. 

    Note: Manuka should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Manuka and 1 drop carrier oil. It can also be added to bath water via a bath gel base to disperse it.

  • Melissa (Lemon Balm) (Melissa officinalis) - is commonly used for anxiety and to promote calmness.

    Note: Use caution on hypersensitive skin, skin that is diseased or damaged, and with children under 2 years old. 

  • Orange (Citrus sinensis) - another oil commonly used for anxiety and to help encourage calmness as found in clinical trials.

    Note: Like Lemon, Orange should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Orange and 1 drop carrier oil. Can cause photosensitivity. Avoid sunlight for 12 hours on the area of skin you applied it to.

  • Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin) - aromatically, Patchouli may be sedating, calming and relaxing, allowing it to reduce anxiety. This is a good oil to add to a diffuser and allow to disperse throughout the day.

    Note: We don't advise using essential oils orally, but if you do, know that it may inhibit blood clotting. 

 

 

  

Essential oils for concentration

We can all relate to the stress and anxiety you get when studying for a big test, or the feeling that you’re not able to concentrate as well as you’d like when you have a deadline staring you in the face. This hits children, teenagers, college students, and adults alike.

You’ll recognize some of the same oils listed below for concentration as the same ones listed for anxiety. Many oils are quite diverse and I love that you can use them for more than one concern. 

  • Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica) - may be used for poor concentration.

    Note: Use caution during pregnancy.

  • Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) – this oil is thought to have an emotionally grounding effect and may be beneficial for nervous tension. 

    Note: Cypress should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Cypress and 1 drop carrier oil. Use caution during pregnancy.
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) - a favorite because it is so versatile. Not only may it help with anxiety, it has also been traditionally used for ADD/ADHD, alertness, poor concentration, sleep, stress, and tension.

    Note: There are no known hazards or contraindications.

  • Lemon (Citrus limon) - is commonly used for poor concentration, relaxation, stress, and may improve clarity of thought and memory.

    Note: Lemon should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Lemon and 1 drop carrier oil. Lemon can cause photosensitivity. Avoid sunlight for 12 hours on the area of skin you applied it to. 

  • Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanoides) - may be beneficial for ADHD as demonstrated in a study with children, ages six to fourteen, who were previously diagnosed with ADHD. The study revealed that inhaling the Vetiver essential oil three times a day for thirty days, "improves the brain activity and reduces the symptoms in ADHD diagnosed subjects." (Source.)

    Note: Use caution during pregnancy.

  • Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) - may lessen oversensitive nerves and is helpful at combating stress and irritability. 

    Note: Manuka should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Manuka and 1 drop carrier oil. It can also be added to bath water via a bath gel base to disperse it.

 

 

  

Essential oils for fatigue

 

Tired of being tired? Does even a good night's sleep mean fatigue the next day? We can often work ourselves to hard, or expect too much of ourselves and our kids when running from activity to activity. 

The first suggestion I have is to simply slow down and learn to say 'no' to projects and invites that you don't 'have' to be involved with. Part of natural wellness is intentionally removing the 'go, go, go' mentality and living life at a slower pace - on purpose.

You’ll recognize some of the same oils as those listed for anxiety and concentration.

 

  • Basil (Ocimum basilicum) - commonly used for chronic fatigue and mental fatigue. as shown in a study where various essential oils, including basil were used and the results were, "while both groups had a reduction in perception of mental exhaustion and moderate burnout, the aromatherapy group had a much greater reduction." (Source.)

    Note: Basil should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin. That means combining 1 drop Basil and 1 drop carrier oil. Avoid during pregnancy or if susceptible to epilepsy.

  • Lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuousus) - often combined with Basil to aid fatigue and diffused or diluted and applied to temples, back of neck, and feet.

    Note: Lemongrass can be extremely irritating to skin so be sure to dilute it at a 1:4 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin. That means combining 1 drop Lemongrass and 4 drops carrier oil. Avoid with diabetes medication, during pregnancy, or if susceptible to epilepsy. 

  • Pine or Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) - is a stimulant to the adrenal cortex, circulatory, and nervous systems. An excellent tonic when added to water and sprinkled on hot rocks in a sauna. (Higley & Higley, 2013)

    Note: Pine should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin. That means combining 1 drop Pine and 1 drop carrier oil. Also use caution as it may be irritating to skin.

  • Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) - used for general fatigue. Aromatically it's said to help supply energy in times of physical weakness and stress. 

    Note: Thyme should be diluted at a 1:4 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin. That means combining 1 drop Thyme and 4 drops carrier oil. Also use caution if you are dealing with high blood pressure.

 

 

  

Essential oils for colds and coughs

When cough and cold season come around, no one likes to suffer. Below you'll find a list of oils that may aid cold and cough symptoms.

Diffuse these oils into the air by adding 1-2 drops into a bowl of hot water and inhaling the vapors.

You can also dilute these oils (ratios noted below) and apply 1-2 drops of diluted oil to the throat, temples, forehead, back of neck, sinus area, below the nose, chest, or to the vita flex points on the feet.

  • Basil (Ocimum basilicum) - has antispasmodic and decongestant properties. Historically is was used for respiratory problems but other possible uses are for bronchitis, chronic colds, chronic mucus, and whooping cough. (Higley & Higley, 2013)

    Note: Basil should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin. That means combining 1 drop Basil and 1 drop carrier oil. Avoid during pregnancy or if susceptible to epilepsy.

  • Fir (Abies sibirica) - primarily used for bronchitis, muscle aches, and muscle fatigue.

    Note: Fir should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin. That means combining 1 drop Fir and 1 drop carrier oil. Always dilute as it may cause skin sensitivity.

  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) - is anticonvulsive, antimicrobial, and antispasmodic as well as being an oil commonly used for many symptoms related to colds: insomnia, nausea, pain, and stress. It may also help bronchitis, earaches, headaches, influenza, migraine headaches, respiratory function, throat infections, and whooping cough. (Source.)

    Note: There are no known hazards or contraindications.

  • Lemon (Citrus limon) - used for air purification and common colds. French medicinal uses include fever and throat infection.
     
    Note: Lemon should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Lemon and 1 drop carrier oil. Lemon can cause photosensitivity. Avoid sunlight for 12 hours on the area of skin you applied it to. 


  • Orange (Citrus sinensis) - may help with colds, bronchitis, fever, and flu.

    Note: Like Lemon, Orange should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Orange and 1 drop carrier oil. Can cause photosensitivity. Avoid sunlight for 12 hours on the area of skin you applied it to.

  • Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) - another quite versatile oil as it has antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, decongestant, and immune-stimulate properties. It's commonly used for colds, coughs, flu, sore throat, strep throat, and viral infections. (Source).

    Note: Tea tree should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Tea tree and 1 drop carrier oil. 

 

  

  

Immune boosting essential oils

Diffuse these oils into the air by adding 1-2 drops into a bowl of hot water and inhaling the vapors for about 1/2 hour at a time.

You can also dilute these oils (ratios noted below) and massage on the bottoms of feet, along the spine, or under the arms. 

  • Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum verum or C. zeylanicum

    Note: Cinnamon bark should be diluted at a 1:4 ratio with a carrier oil before
    applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Cinnamon bark oil and 4 drops carrier oil. Avoid during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Repeated use can cause skin irritation and sensitivity. May inhibit blood clotting.

  • Cumin (Cuminum cyminum)

    Note: Cumin should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Cumin and 1 drop carrier oil. Use caution during pregnancy. May cause photosensitivity so avoid sunlight on areas applied for 12 hours.

  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia

    Note: There are no known hazards or contraindications.

  • Oregano (Origanum compactum)

    Note: Oregano should be diluted at a 1:4 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Oregano and 4 drops carrier oil. Use caution during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Inhibits blood clotting. Repeated use can cause skin irritation and sensitivity.

  • Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia

    Note: Tea tree should be diluted at a 1:1 ratio with a carrier oil before applying to skin and/or vita flex points. That means combining 1 drop Tea tree and 1 drop carrier oil. 

 

 

  

Essential oil wellness blend

I like making a wellness blend that covers the majority of the issues we’ve discussed above with some of the more versatile oils:

  • 20 drops Lavender essential oil
  • 20 drops Tea tree essential oil
  • 20 drops Orange or Lemon essential oil
  • 20 + drops carrier oil of choice (almond oil, grapeseed oil, olive oil)

Combine the essential oils and carrier oil into a 15 ml bottle with a roller ball on top for easiest application.

Rub this across the bottoms of the feet and at night, right before bedtime.

 

Looking for a more extensive list on essential oils and how to use them with candida overgrowth?
Download our free list of 15 symptoms and the essential oils to use.

 

  

Other essential oil resources

 

This article may contain special links through which we earn a small commission if you make a purchase (your price does not change). We only recommend products and services we trust.

 

What is your favorite essential oil and how do you use it? Tell us about it below!

 

This post was updated and republished by Paula Miller on 7/30/21. 

 


 

Sources:

Higley, C., & Higley, A. (2013). Reference guide for essential oils. Abundant Health.

Tisser, R. (2014). Essential oil safety (second edition). Churchill Livingstone.

Fayazi, S., Babashahi, M., & Rezaei, M. (2011). The effect of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety level of the patients in preoperative period. Iranian journal of nursing and midwifery research, 16(4), 278–283.

Lee, S.-O., & Hwang, J.-H. (2011). Effects of Aroma Inhalation Method on Subjective Quality of Sleep, State Anxiety, and Depression in Mothers Following Cesarean Section Delivery. Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing, 18(1), 54–62. https://doi.org/https://www.koreascience.or.kr/article/JAKO201128563050570.page

Mannucci, C., Calapai, F., Cardia, L., Inferrera, G., D'Arena, G., Di Pietro, M., Navarra, M., Gangemi, S., Ventura Spagnolo, E., & Calapai, G. (2018). Clinical Pharmacology of Citrus aurantiumand Citrus sinensis for the Treatment of Anxiety. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2018, 3624094. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3624094 

Friedmann, T. (n.d.). Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Varney, E., & Buckle, J. (2013). Effect of Inhaled essential oils on mental exhaustion and Moderate Burnout: A small pilot study. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 19(1), 69–71. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2012.0089 

Yamina, B. (2013). Antibacterial study of two medicinal plants (Allium sativum) and (Lavandula angustifolia) . International Journal of Management Sciences and Business Research, 3(1). 

Carson, C. F., Hammer, K. A., & Riley, T. V. (2006). Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) oil: a review of antimicrobial and other medicinal properties. Clinical microbiology reviews, 19(1), 50–62. https://doi.org/10.1128/CMR.19.1.50-62.2006

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